Farinheira

Gold Height 8.2 cm (3.2 in.) Diameter 17.2 cm (6.8 in.) Weight 274 gr. Brazil, probably Ouro Preto - mid 18th century

A rare farinheiras, in the shape of a bowl with circular embossed décor of scrolls, shells, rocailles and smooth cartouches with irregular contours. Four bouquets are directed towards the center of the circular base, their contour enhanced and, in the center, fine engraved flowers. The branches are united by delicate garlands with leaf motifs.

The farinheiras were very thin bowls that were used throughout Brazilian territory to eat farinha, a purée of manioc flour. The very thin structure, allowed easy dislodgement of purée. The heirs of the former tamboladeiras (tembladeras in Spain) in silver with two handles were in use as the most luxurious tableware in Brazil, during the 17th century and beginning of the 18th century where silver was very scarce and expensive in comparison to Hispanic possessions. In the first decades of the 18th century, with the discovery of gold in Brazil and the expansion of its economy, the tamboladeiras underwent an evolution.

In the first decades of the 18th century, with the discovery of gold in Brazil and the expansion of its economy, the tamboladeiras underwent an evolution. They lost the two handles and transformed in farinheiras, the only typology in Viceroyal America. Known gold farinheiras are extremely scarce in museums and private collections.

The Capitanía de Minas Gerais, whose ancient capital was Vila Rica, now Ouro Preto, was the most important center of gold production in Colonial Brazil since its discovery in 1699. At the height of the gold boom in mid 18th century, there were 110,000 people in Ouro Preto, compared with 30,000 in Rio de Janeiro and 50,000 in New York at the end of the century. In 1760, half of the gold production in the world came from Brazilian origin. Also, with the discovery of diamonds in Minas Gerais State in 1730, Brazil became the world's largest supplier of diamonds over the course of 150 years.

As in Potosi silverware was used elsewhere in abundance. In this region of Brazil, all of the elite's dinnerware was prepared in gold. An example of that golden era of Brazilian orfevrerie is this extraordinary and delicate piece of Rococo design, made to a high standard by an anonymous and masterful goldsmith. To catch a glimpse of this colossal exuberance of gold in old Brazil, its destination was reflected in what may be a unique aspect of global orfevrerie: the rich and extensive jewelry of the Brazilian female slaves that lasted until the 19th century.

More details
Close

EXHIBITOR

EGUIGUREN Arte de Hispanoamérica

"Arms & Armor; Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; Furniture and Decorative Arts; Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Paintings; Old Master Paintings; Silver"

More about the exhibitor

Please note that the objects shown on the website are for illustration purposes only; it cannot be guaranteed that the objects currently shown on the website will pass TEFAF vetting which takes place shortly prior to the opening of the Fair.

DISCOVER MORE ART